Cure Duchenne is an Official Charity of the Run Disney Tinker Bell Half Marathon

Newport Beach, Calif., June 11, 2012

CureDuchenne, a nonprofit that raises awareness and funds to find a cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, is proud to be an official charity of the Tinker Bell Half Marathon. The Tinker Bell Half Marathon weekend is January 18-20, 2013. 

Disneyland® Resort becomes Never Land for a magical weekend. It starts with a Family 5K and a Kids’ Races and culminates with 13.1 mile run that weaves through Disneyland® Resort. Registration for the CureDuchenne Crusaders team begins next week. For more information, please call CureDuchenne at 949-872-2552.

“CureDuchenne is excited to participate in the Tinker Bell Half Marathon,” said Debra Miller, founder and CEO of CureDuchenne. “The CureDuchenne Crusaders team will help raise awareness and money to help fund promising research for the 300,000 boys worldwide with Duchenne.”

Duchenne is a devastating muscle disease that impacts 1 in 3,500 boys. Boys are usually diagnosed by the age of 5, in a wheelchair by 12 and most don’t survive their mid-20s.

About CureDuchenne

CureDuchenne, a national nonprofit organization located in Newport Beach, Calif., is gaining international attention for its efforts to raise funds and awareness for Duchenne – a devastating and lethal muscle disease in children. One in every 3,500 male births results in a child being afflicted with the disease. More than 24,000 boys are living with the disease in the United States alone, and most will not survive their mid-20s.

The funds CureDuchenne raises support the most promising research projects aimed at treating and curing the disease with the help of its distinguished panel of Scientific Advisors from around the world. To date, seven research projects have made their way into human clinical trials with support from CureDuchenne. This accelerated push to move research from the lab into clinical trials could save the lives of those afflicted and give them hope for halting the progress of the disease. Very few health-related nonprofits have been as successful in being a catalyst for human clinical trials.