3rd Annual Strike Out Duchenne Wooden Bat Tournament to Raise Funds to Find a Cure for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

Dayton, Ohio, July 12, 2012

Dayton, Ohio, July 12, 2012 – More than 60 baseball teams from around the region will play in the 3rd annual “Strike Out Duchenne Wooden Bat Tournament” on July 12 through July 15 at the Brick City Sports Club fields to raise awareness and funds to find a cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. 

This tournament will host a special Duchenne game on July 14 at 4:00 p.m. at the Action Sports Center so boys with Duchenne have the opportunity to play at their own level in a safe and supportive environment. The Brick City Blast players will guide Duchenne boys no matter their ability or mobility. 

Duchenne is a devastating muscle disease that impacts 1 in 3,500 boys. Boys are usually diagnosed with Duchenne by the age of 5, in a wheelchair by 12 and most don’t survive their mid-20s. Proceeds of the tournament will benefit CureDuchenne, a nonprofit organization that raises awareness and funds to find a cure for Duchenne. 

“We believe every kid should have the chance to play baseball,” said Chuck Doran, president of Brick City Sports Club. “We understand that boys with Duchenne often enjoy baseball but can’t play the game because of weakening muscles so we wanted to provide an opportunity where they can participate based on their ability.” 

The “Strike Out Duchenne Wooden Bat Tournament” includes 64 teams with baseball players ranging from age 8 to 16.  The tournament begins on Thursday, July 12 at 6:15 p.m. at five different fields. The finals will be on Sunday, July 15 at 3:00 p.m.

About CureDuchenne

CureDuchenne, a national nonprofit organization located in Newport Beach, Calif., is gaining international attention for its efforts to raise funds and awareness for Duchenne – a devastating and lethal muscle disease in children. One in every 3,500 male births results in a child being afflicted with the disease. More than 24,000 boys are living with the disease in the United States alone, and most will not survive their mid-20s.

The funds CureDuchenne raises support the most promising research projects aimed at treating and curing the disease with the help of its distinguished panel of Scientific Advisors from around the world. To date, seven research projects have made their way into human clinical trials with support from CureDuchenne. This accelerated push to move research from the lab into clinical trials could save the lives of those afflicted and give them hope for halting the progress of the disease. Very few health-related nonprofits have been as successful in being a catalyst for human clinical trials.

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